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Wed Jul 1 |
OFF THE COMET
with VANCE ROMANCE, METAFONICS, ROY G BIV
Thu Jul 2 |
LUKE BELL
with BEN MARSHAL, MICHELLE MANDICO
Fri Jul 3 |
THE FAMILY CREST
with BRENT COWLES (OF YOU ME & APOLLO)
Sun Jul 5 |
TRIPPER JONES (Release Party)
with A MEAZY, DAMIEN THE ARCHITECT, TRAYCE CHAPMAN, RAY REED
Tue Jul 7 |
DARK SEAS
with THE KINKY FINGERS, SCARY DRUGS, CHOCOLATE DIAMOND
Wed Jul 8 |
FUTURE CULTURE
with THE THREADBARONS, REMEMBER THE RADIO, D_HENNEY (Of Cougar Gold)
Thu Jul 9 |
ALBEEZ 4 SHEEZ (Birthday Celebration & Roast)
with FLY PHOOLISH, GRE3DY GRE, KOO QUA, KING LOC, LADY LO KEY, HME, NOWHERE KIDS, BEHIND THE MIC
Fri Jul 10 |
BDMF ~ BLUEBIRD DISTRICT MUSIC FESTIVAL
with A. TOM COLLINS, PAN ASTRAL, THE ROYAL, ROSSONIAN, MODERN SUSPECTS, SF1
Sat Jul 11 |
BDMF ~ BLUEBIRD DISTRICT MUSIC FESTIVAL
with DIRTY FEW & FRIENDS, TORTUGA, THE BLUE RIDER, THE OUTFIT, BLEAK PLAZA, PALEHORSE/PALERIDER, THROUGH THE MOUNTAIN, SILVER & GOLD, TYTO ALBA | SOMERSET CATALOG | SLOW CAVES
Sun Jul 12 |
BDMF ~ BLUEBIRD DISTRICT MUSIC FESTIVAL
with WE'S US, CHAMPAGNE CHARLIE, THE ROBBY WICKS BAND, SARAH & THE MEANIES, GLOWING HOUSE, RAVEN & THE WRITING DESK, TREEHOUSE SANCTUM, MITCHEL EVAN & THE MANGROVE, LUCAS SWAFFORD
Mon Jul 13 |
RATBOYS
with SLEEPING WEATHER, SLOW CAVES, THE VELVETEERS
Tue Jul 14 |
SONREAL
with HIGH FIVE, INPUT + BROKEN, ROOKE5
Wed Jul 15 |
JOY
with MEDUSA, BROTHER SISTER HEX
Thu Jul 16 |
THE EVAN HOLM BAND
with SING, CICADAS, THE LITTLE RAVENS
Fri Jul 17 |
MARRIAGES
Sat Jul 18 |
WELCOME TO THE D.O.P.E. GAME PRESENTS
with CATCH LUNGS, HUSTLE MAN, SID MADRID & MORE!, HOSTED BY: ROB4REAL & MC BIGHOUSE
Sun Jul 19 |
FILTHY STILL
with GRANNY TWEED, RANDALL CONRAD OLINGER
Sun Jul 19 |
SUNDAY BBQ SERIES
with GANG FORWARD, AERIAL RUN, EMILY SHERVE
Mon Jul 20 |
THE HUNTS
with PANIC IS PERFECT
Tue Jul 21 |
VINCE STAPLES
with FO CHIEF, PLANES, PAPPA J
Wed Jul 22 |
DEATH KITTEN
with DAENERYS AND THE TARGARYENS, NASTY BUNCH OF BITCHES, SUZI HOMEWRECKER
Thu Jul 23 |
AKLOCK
with MARKAUS & DM WRIGHT, LUKE SKYY & CEEJ, CLEMITS & DUBB SICKS, DJ AWHAT
Sun Jul 26 |
SUNDAY BBQ SERIES
with SPEAKEASY, NO MORE EXCUSES, VICTORY! VICTORY!, ORDINARY WORDS
Tue Jul 28 |
LORDS OF BEACON HOUSE
with GREENMOUNTAIN, MONOCLE STACHE
Wed Jul 29 |
ELISIUM
Thu Jul 30 |
SAM OUTLAW
Fri Jul 31 |
FOXFIELD FOUR
Sat Aug 1 |
HEATERS
with TAVERNS (members of Thee Dang Dangs)
Wed Aug 5 |
LEE GALLAGHER AND THE HALLELUJAH
with CLOUD CATCHER, THE SEASON OF THE WITCH
Fri Aug 7 |
RASPUTINA
with DANIEL KNOX
Sat Aug 8 |
HOLLY MIRANDA
with MARNIE HERALD
Wed Aug 12 |
POP NATION
Sat Aug 15 |
THE LOLLYGAGS
with SOFT SKULLS, THE BORN READIES
Sat Aug 15 |
SPECIAL PERFORMANCE FOLLOWING LANGHORNE SLIM
Tue Aug 18 |
MAMA MAGNOLIA
with HIBBITY DIBBITY, DANDU
Fri Aug 21 |
MINER
Thu Sep 3 |
CROOKS ON TAPE
Sun Sep 27 |
THE FRATELLIS (DJ SET)
Sun Oct 4 |
TORRES
Thu Oct 22 |
TEEN DAZE
with HEAVENLY BEAT
Wed Oct 28 |
GIRLPOOL
with ESKIMEAUX, TOLD SLANT
Sat Oct 31 |
ALBERT HAMMOND, JR.

Wed Jun 25 | Lost Lake Presents | 21+

EMA  

MAS YSA

Doors open at 8 PM   |   Show starts at 9 PM   |   $12 ADV | $15 DAY OF SHOW





Having teased us with a new track ‘Satellites’ last month, released to rave reviews and scored Pitchfork’s Best New Music who said “The most bracing thing yet from an artist already more bracing than most”, EMA returns with her highly anticipated second album The Future’s Void, released on 7 April via City Slang.

Erika M. Anderson first graced the limelight under the guise of EMA in May 2011, when the brilliantly scuffed debut album Past Life Martyred Saints was released to a multitude of acclaim. After having spent time in the California underground fronting the genre-defying cult duo Gowns with Ezra Buchla, Past Life Martyred Saints offered a deeper glimpse into the world of EMA. An absorbing and ambitious masterpiece that revealed a unique and feed-backed noisy guitar style, a skill for visceral songwriting and a DIY recording ethos, it showcased a distinctive sonic signature that sounded like nothing else around.

If Past Life Martyred Saints was an inward exploration of human relationships and their toll, The Future’s Void catapults them out into space, both thematically and musically. The album meditates on universal themes of how we interact with the wider world and how that interaction is increasingly modified by technology. Through collaboration with Leif Shackelford on production duties, the sound of this record reflects these themes and instead of using electronics to create a polished, airless environment, Anderson’s techno-future thrashes strongly between harsh tones and paranoia, to beautiful colour bursts and mellow guitar strums.

Lyrically, Anderson tries to answer the question so often put to her during the last round of press and interviews: “How does it feel?” to be pushed through a media vortex and back. The answer is of course, complicated. On ‘3Jane’ she seems plaintive and introspective, with lyrics about visuals and consent that are even more poignant in the age of posted YouTube assaults, bullied teen suicides and revenge porn. On ‘Neuromancer’, an electronic punk rant with analog synths and machine drums, she rages, and explores the implications of building an online database of all your pictures and information. “It’s basically an AI (artificial intelligence)” she says. And it’s not just those in the media spotlight who have them, it’s all of us.

This is where Anderson has always excelled, in taking the chaos and angst of the modern age and making it relatable. While sonically The Future’s Void is a big step up and out, lyrically it’s in a similar vein to Past Life Martyred Saints, with EMA herself laying bare, cracking sly jokes, and making the nuances of her story seem like ours as well.

“I realised that we were all kind of building these AIs, whether intentionally or not, and how the data we post online is parsed by programs that see patterns in our behaviour that we fail to see ourselves; how and where and what we eat, status reports that reveal our moods, our shopping habits, who we date and who we stalk, where and how we spend our money. Literally, they know more than you do about the things that you do. And that’s just the data we give up willingly, to say nothing of what is taken surreptitiously.”

The opening track “Satellites” was written before the current NSA scandal and hints at a more nostalgic paranoia, in drawing current parallels to the dream of the former Soviet “satellite” countries, where “everyone has equal access but is also under constant surveillance”. Musically the track hints at a further emboldened EMA, without forgoing the industrial-noise and glorious fuzz of her solo debut and previous work with Gowns. Opening with a wall of hiss, scree and galloping piano motif, ‘Satellites’ bursts into a flame of feedback and bass to provide one her best tracks to date, as well as introducing analog modular synths into the mix.

As well as EMA pulls off these topical and outspoken tracks, she’s still got a knack for a classic pop tune as heard on the likes of ‘So Blonde’, with its hooky grunge riff and playful lyrics about “generic and specific cool blonde kids, maybe you knew one in high school or college or at a party at 5am in your 20s”. Similarly, the catchy ‘When She Comes’, a nostalgic paean about a teenage Riot Grrl friendship. Along with ‘Dead Celebrity’, these tracks are at odds with the more abrasive and electronic likes of ‘Solace’ and ‘Cthulu’, the latter climaxing with a Gary Numan ‘Are Friends Electric’ style breakdown that sounds like nothing Erika has produced before. Despite moving towards electronic sounds, the machines are mostly played live and they often possess aDIY ‘first take best take’ aesthetic that rails against the carefully constructed and glistening sheen of the digital age. This punk spirit maintains a spontaneity that is all too often lost.

“This record is the sound of resistance to digital commodification” Erika explains. “I naturally gravitate towards hooks and melodies and in some ways, the structure of these songs is the poppiest yet. The harshness and production strikes a balance with that so they don’t sound like they could be on adverts.”

So, The Future’s Void means the future IS void? Or the void that belongs to the future? According to Anderson, both work.

Either way, The Future’s Void is a record that seeks to deal with the fact that certain ideas that once seemed futuristic are now the norm, while also trying to sidestep a lot of the musical tropes that come along with exploring technology. It straddles the ugly and animalistic, the pretty and civilised, the digital and the analog and the past and the present, resulting in a timeless and yet timely piece of work. And like any great punk record, it questions social convention and rebels against the status quo.

EMA continues to evoke a unique and ambitious sound that saw her rightfully recognised as one of the most singular artists to emerge in 2011, and is likely to send her back into the public consciousness once again in 2014.

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